Monthly Archives: October 2015

Job Seekers: What Do You Want To Do?

Job Seekers: Balancing the 3 legged stool: Where, What, and How Much?

A quality of life discussion that each person (or couple) needs to decide for themselves:

  1. Where do you want to live?
  2. What do you want to do?
  3. How much do you want to make?

What Do You Want To Do

What do you want to do?

Experienced #Registered Nurses and #Physical Therapists are at 0% unemployment. The number of RNs being advertised by hospitals in the Seattle metro area (Tacoma to Bellevue to Everett) exceeds the number of available Nurses. Same with PTs and, arguably, OTs (#Occupational Therapists).

RNs: Not everyone can handle Critical Care Nursing (whether CCU, CICU, CVICU or ICU). Similarly, Hospice, Long Term Care and Geriatric can be cup-filling for one person and not for another. And L&D vs. NICU is another example.

PT Specialist Certifications include: Cardiovascular/Pulmonary; Clinical Electrophysiology; Geriatrics; Neurology; Orthopedics; Pediatrics; Sports; and Women’s Health. Lots of choices.

Every job has its ups and downs; that’s why they pay us and call it ‘work.’ The trick is to find a career that’s cup filling (fulfilling) vs. cup draining (depressing).

So take charge of your career! Investigate your options. Go to the applicable Professional Associations to learn the specific certifications within each scope of practice. Then visit a local chapter meeting to network and learn more.

 

Job Seekers: How Much Do You Want to Make?

Job Seekers: Balancing the 3 legged stool: Where, What, and How Much?

A quality of life discussion that each person (or couple) needs to decide for themselves:

  1. Where do you want to live?
  2. What do you want to do?
  3. How much do you want to make?

Money

How much do you want to make?

The classic answer is still the best. Take 3 sheets of paper and label them: Needs;  Wants; Desires. It’s a simple and difficult exercise at the same time. Even more so if you have a partner participating. The answers at the end are fascinating. Do it again in 4-6 months and see how they change.

  • Need: is based on fixed costs. Examples include rent, car payments, school loans, health issues and child support. These are easy to accumulate.
  • Want: is driven by quality of life issues such as: getting your  own apartment, or buying a condo.
  • Desire is driven by high quality of life issues such as: buy house in a safe area for a family with a good commute distance; retiring at 50.

Examples:

  • Transportation: I need to get to work. I want a car. I desire a new car.
  • Living: I need a place to live. I want to rent. My desire is to buy a house.

In the end, the question of ‘How much’ pretty much answers itself. That is, until you get to the real question which is, ‘How much is enough?’ No patient on their death bed says, ‘If only I’d made more money.’

Finding a balance is where true happiness is found. For example, #Physicians#Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants all treat patients and prescribe medication. With the #Affordable Care Act Physicians are becoming employees. The ‘good old days’ of autonomy, freedom, power and money are gone. But the sacrifice of time and school debt remain. 

 

 

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Job Seekers: Where Do You Want To Live?

Job Seekers: Balancing the 3 legged stool: Where, What, and How Much?

A quality of life discussion that each person (or couple) needs to decide for themselves:

  1. Where do you want to live?
  2. What do you want to do?
  3. How much do you want to make?

weathervane

Where do you want to live?

Family is usually the primary consideration, followed by career. My immediate and extended families were not factors, and I’m in tech (web based)  so I had the freedom to look anywhere. I love the mountains while my partner loves a beach (sorry, Denver). Both of us want a large growing metro area with low crime, and good education and healthcare options, but not a mega-city. Once we narrow down our ‘Where’ options it’s pretty easy to see which cities offer enough good job prospects.

For #Healthcare careers: Experienced #Registered Nurses, #Physical Therapists and #Physicians have 0% unemployment and can choose any ‘Where’ that suits them. All other healthcare professionals are also in high demand with employment opportunities in every city, but you may have to bear the cost of relocation. Travelers are the best way to ‘try before you buy’ so pre-register your skills and interests with these firms so you’re ‘on file’ when that new opening gets posted.

 

Washington Ranks #1 for RNs

Registered Nurses is the largest occupation (not just in #Healthcare) with an above-average wage ($69,790 as of May 2014, the latest available data) Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) 03/25/2015.

HappyNurse
 

WalletHub ranks Washington state #1 for #RNs based on opportunity, competition and work environment 2015′s Best & Worst States for Nurses. Their Top 10:

  • Washington, Colorado, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Texas, Wyoming, Alaska, New Hampshire, New Mexico and Oklahoma

Monster ranks California #1 for RNs based on both the number of jobs and salary Top 10 Best and Worst States to be a Nurse. Their Top 10:

  • Based on number of jobs: California, Florida, New York, Ohio, North Carolina, Illinois, New Jersey, Michigan, Georgia, Massachusetts
  • Based on salary: California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Alaska, Delaware, Oregon, Nevada, Maryland, Connecticut

For Travelers, Fastaff Travel Nursing identifies its highest demand states for Nurses The 5 States Most in Need of Nurses. Their Top 5:

  • Based on number of jobs: California, Florida, New York, Ohio, North Carolina